A day at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Today I stopped by The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. I always enjoy a trip there, but for some reason today was particularly enjoyable. Maybe it was my warm (figuratively, because it’s literally 30 degrees outside) start to the day, eating a “Kitchen Sink scrambler” from Succotash with two old friends…or maybe it was just some uninfluenced fate that this trip would be a good one.

IMG_3620I wasn’t interested in grazing over only the contemporary section like usual. I wanted to venture through all the ages of art on display.

I made a full circle: went through the Egyptian section; read up on the mummified 50-some-odd-year-old man, scanned the Greek vases that reminded me of Hercules; tiptoed into the rooms set up with authentic Victorian furniture; glazed over the Roman Catholic crucifixes that starred down at me like they did back in high school; and, lastly, savored the contemporary art that always proves so pleasing.IMG_3619

This visit I didn’t just graze through the vast collection the Nelson has to offer: I swallowed up all I could. I read the captions for any art that raised my brow and I stood in front of pieces in admiration rather than my typical inspiration. This trip was one that made me realize how selfish my appreciation for art has been in the past. Typically I visit museums behind a camera lens, trying to snapshot every work. This time I took only a few photos, making them thoughtful rather than plentiful. While it’s often a good thing to be inspired by others’ work, it’s also a good thing to simply take it in and appreciate it for the original work it is, not the way you can interpret it in your own doodle or sketch or painting.

Anyhow, today was a day filled with marvel for these artists as well as satisfying for my itch to do something different.

One of my favorite displays at the museum. This piece was created by Felix Gonzalez-Torres. The beautifully written caption hanging beside it reads: "Here, two factory-made light bulbs shine together to suggest a pair of lovers in one shared point of illumination. Although they glow brightly in unison, one bulb will inevitably burn out before the other, reminding us of the transience of human relationships and the temporality of life."

One of my favorite displays at the museum. This piece was created by Felix Gonzalez-Torres. The beautifully written caption hanging beside it reads: “Here, two factory-made light bulbs shine together to suggest a pair of lovers in one shared point of illumination. Although they glow brightly in unison, one bulb will inevitably burn out before the other, reminding us of the transience of human relationships and the temporality of life.”

 

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